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Corvids Have Nasal Bristles PSA by SageKorppi Corvids Have Nasal Bristles PSA by SageKorppi
Mostly because I can, and also because it is a pet peeve of mine.

NO NOSTRILS!!!

Quote from: Madge, S. and Burn, H. 1999. Crows & Jays. Princeton University Press, New Jersey. www.amazon.com/Crows-Jays-Stev…

Photo credits:

Black Currawong: JJ Harrison via Wikimedia Commons
Australian magpie: Aviceda via Wikimedia Commons

Blue Jay: DickDaniels via Wikimedia Commons
Green Jay: Alan Wilson via Wikimedia Commons
Eurasian Jay: Mark Medcalf via Wikimedia Commons
Clark’s Nutcracker: Jason Popesku via Wikimedia Commons
Black-Billed Magpie: David Merrett via Wikimedia Commons
Green Magpie: Thomas Ruedas via Wikimedia Commons
Rufous Treepie: Jon Connell via Wikimedia Commons
Pander’s Ground-Jay: Alastair Rae via Wikimedia Commons
Alpine Chough: Ken Billington via Wikimedia Commons

Common Raven: David Hofmann via Wikimedia Commons
American Crow: cuatrok77 hernandez via Wikimedia Commons
Jackdaw: Tony Hisgett via Wikimedia Commons
House Crow: J.M.Garg via Wikimedia Commons
Jungle Crow: aomorikuma via Wikimedia Commons
White-Billed Crow: Josep del Hoyo via The Internet Bird Collection
New Caledonian Crow: original author unknown via Google Search
Pied Crow: Lip Kee Yap via Wikimedia Commons
White-Necked Raven: Greg Hume via Wikimedia Commons
Thick-Billed Raven: original author unknown, via Wikimedia Commons
White-Necked Crow: ZankaM via Wikimedia Commons
Australian Raven: Brett Donald via Wikimedia Commons

Rook: Andreas Trepte
Grey Crow: Brian J. Coates via The Internet Bird Collection
Grey Crow: mehdhalaouate via The Internet Bird Collection
Add a Comment:
 
:iconthenightmarevisions:
TheNightmareVisions Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2015
Oh, and please, tell me: what is the function of the nasal bristles? 
Reply
:iconthenightmarevisions:
What about the corvids like Cyanocorax cyanomelas or Cyanocorax caeruleus, the corvid family representatives from here Brazil? Their bristle is located at the forehead, not the beak, and it doesn't even cover their nostril.
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:iconrahula87:
Rahula87 Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2014
Also Pinyon Jay does not have nasal bristles. This guide is really useful^^
Reply
:iconsagekorppi:
SageKorppi Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Yup, I noted that in the graphic (just under the treepie, ground-jay, and chough).

The pinyon jay genus name, Gymnorhinus means "bare nostril".

Though I do see I need to update the scientific name for the Aussie magpie and butcher bird...
Reply
:iconrahula87:
Rahula87 Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2014
Thank you for the info^^
Reply
:icontenko72:
tenko72 Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013
Ah! I didn't know that feature had a name. I was practicing drawing crows and I noticed and sketched those, but I had no idea they were a defining feature of corvids or that they covered the nose holes. Now, I know.
Reply
:iconpinerain:
PineRain Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Amen. :)
Reply
:iconblueflamedphoenix:
BlueFlamedPhoenix Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2013
Fantastic tutorial! I never noticed this about corvids but I will keep it it mind when I draw them now!
Reply
:iconrestlesshands:
restlesshands Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2013  Professional General Artist
Saving this for future reference.

And now that I've been alerted to their existence, I'm now curious what function (if any) nasal bristles have.
Reply
:iconkitsuchan59:
Kitsuchan59 Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2013
OMG! I did not realize Jays were corvids as well. Thanks.
Reply
:iconwilldabeast-0305:
Willdabeast-0305 Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
I think my crow/raven knowledge just increased by about x10

Also, I like how it says "Green Jay", even though the bird shown is extremely blue : )
Reply
:iconsagekorppi:
SageKorppi Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Haha, yeah, their heads are blue but the rest of the bird is quite green: [link]

One of my favorite jays!
Reply
:iconwilldabeast-0305:
Willdabeast-0305 Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Okay, now it makes sense. I thought it was just one of those things that didn't make sense, or that perhaps the guy who named them was named Green.

Excellent guide, by the way. Next time I draw a bird, I'll check to see if it has nasal bristles or not.
Reply
:iconjuliagracearts:
JuliaGraceArts Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2013  Professional General Artist
Very handy reference! Thanks!
Reply
:iconcaycowa:
caycowa Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2013
I learned something today. Thanks.
Reply
:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2013  Professional General Artist
Of course, currawongs and aust magpies are in the "mud-nest" family, these are possubly related to the ancestors of crows, because crows apparently originated in Australia. Also, birds of paradise are descended from crows.
Reply
:iconsagekorppi:
SageKorppi Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Yup, but sharing a common ancestor doesn't make them corvids ;)
Reply
:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013  Professional General Artist
Of course not, I just thought you might get a kick out of knowing that they are a sucessful Australian export.
Reply
:iconsagekorppi:
SageKorppi Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Gotcha ^^
Reply
:iconghostinthepines:
GhostInThePines Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you for doing this! It's also a pet peeve of mine, along with incorrect feathering in general!
Reply
:icondark-hyena:
Dark-Hyena Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2013
Absolutely marvelous, and useful!

Just out of curiosity, what are the differences between carrion and American crows?
Reply
:iconsagekorppi:
SageKorppi Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Am. crows and carrion crows are superficially similar, but are obviously different species, however Am. crows are pretty much the American equivalent of carrion crows in the rest of the world. The physical differences are subtle, but the easiest one when you have a bird in hand or a skin are the contour/body feathers. They are "rounded" in Am. crows and "pointy" in carrion crows.
Reply
:iconroesoftheshadows:
roesoftheshadows Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013
Very informative! Honestly I dont think I have ever drawn a corvid x_x
Reply
:iconsomercet:
somercet Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012
Awesomely detailed!
Reply
:icondeathmango:
deathmango Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2012
Ooo, you put together good reference sheets when you're angry... ;P
Reply
:iconmeihua:
meihua Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2012
Thank you for this, I drew what's probably my first accurate raven ;P [link]
Reply
:icontehzebra:
tehzebra Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is very similar to the angry tutorial I will someday make entitled "Dogs and Cats are NOT HORSES". Because for god's sake, people always draw the hind legs of canines and felines WRONG and they look like horse hind legs...
Reply
:iconsagekorppi:
SageKorppi Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Preach it!
Reply
:iconsteeljaw:
SteelJaw Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
THIIIIIIIIIIS. I sure hope a LOT of folks see this! I'm with you 100% on this being a top artistic pet peeve (along with the mistakes made when folks draw hyenas). I have quite a few commissions of my raven character with no nasal bristles, and it makes me cry.
Reply
:iconnerxualoh:
NerxualOh Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:D Thank you for this! I do want to tell the difference between a raven and a crow besides their wings when they spread them.
Reply
:iconbadi89:
badi89 Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
many many thanks for this one!
Reply
:iconmeihua:
meihua Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012
Phew, I drew my pinyon jays without them so I got worried until you wrote that they are one of the sort-of exceptions. :XD: Great PSA!
Reply
:iconjd-man:
JD-man Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
This deviation reminds me of the article in the following link. It's about corvids, but not their nasal bristles. Have you read it?

[link]
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:iconsagekorppi:
SageKorppi Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Not the particular article (thanks for linking!), but I've read everything they are talking about. Can't wait to add my publications to the pile of "corvids are rad" literature ^^
Reply
:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you for enlightening us! But now if you'll allow me to enlighten you, you misspelled "nostrils" in that last sentence.
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:iconsagekorppi:
SageKorppi Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Ack! Fixed! Thanks for catching that and letting me know!
Reply
:iconravenstarstudio:
RavenStarStudio Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
LOL! Brilliant and thanks for the intro to the grey crow, neat corvid! :)
Reply
:iconlunitaire:
Lunitaire Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Professional General Artist
Woah. Duly noted. This is a detail that I don't think I ever noticed when looking at photographs, but now I am aware and will keep this in mind.
Reply
:iconsomniopus:
somniopus Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Student Artist
No, seriously, how did I not ever notice 'no visible nostrils'?

I am ashamed. XD
Reply
:iconsilverspiritwolf:
silverspiritwolf Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
The bristles have always been my favorite feature of corvids. It never occurred to me it was a defining trait of the family group, nor did it ever occur to me it has a name. Yay for nasal bristles! Thanks for the nerd lesson :)
Reply
:iconsilenced-dreams:
Silenced-Dreams Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I KNOW OF THE GREY CROW

if only because of my corvids of the world book >o>

but yeah, nose fuzz for erryone :D
Reply
:iconsagekorppi:
SageKorppi Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
*high five for grey crows* :D
Reply
:iconsilenced-dreams:
Silenced-Dreams Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
such cutiepatooties ;o;

It's wierd seeing them go from white to dark, ahah. CROWS Y SO CONFUSING.
Reply
:icondawnsentinel:
DawnSentinel Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
Thank you so frigging much! :D
Reply
:iconphilipharvey:
PhilipHarvey Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
All nasal hair present and correct here hehe :D
Reply
:iconwolfsjal:
Wolfsjal Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
Hee hee. *applauds*
Reply
:iconmydigitalmind:
mydigitalmind Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I don't draw them (obviously) but I learned something new today!
Reply
:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
Thanks for doing the chart, I was totaly unaware of this :)
Reply
:iconannoyed-ambulocetus:
annoyed-ambulocetus Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
The thick billed crow is aptly named
Reply
:iconmirroreyesserval:
mirroreyesserval Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012   Digital Artist
Aaaaaand cue the mad dash through my gallery to see if I've done this. Looks like I'm safe. >_> Then again I haven't drawn many birds.

THANK YOU FOR THIS! Sometimes things like this need to be pointed out. I know I hate it when I leave out a characteristic physical trait I hadn't consciously noticed. And now that I've seen it, I can't un-see it. One things for sure, I will never forget nasal bristles on corvids... and now it's gonna bug the hell out of me when I see it drawn wrong. lol XD
Reply
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